Creative Conciliation's Members

KM
Keavy Martin
Lead Facilitator

Keavy Martin is a settler scholar of Indigenous literatures at the University of Alberta in Treaty 6 and Métis territory. Her first book, Stories in a New Skin: Approaches to Inuit Literature (winner of the 2012 Gabrielle Roy Prize), explores the intersections of Inuit traditional knowledge about literature with southern academic reading practices. She is also the co-editor (with Julie Rak and Norma Dunning) of the 2015 edition of Inuit elder Mini Aodla Freeman’s autobiography, Life Among the Qallunaat, which includes material and phrasing restored from the author’s original typescript. With Dylan Robinson, Martin has edited the forthcoming book Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action In and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (Wilfrid Laurier UP, 2016). In 2016, Martin was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists. As principal investigator for Creative Conciliations, Martin directs resources toward our partners and collaborators, basks in the glow of their brilliance, and pursues questions about the possibilities of thinking beyond ‘reconciliation,’ particularly in Treaty 6 territory. She is also the mother of a young son, Edzazii.

Dylan Robinson
Dylan Robinson
Co-Investigator

Dylan Robinson is a Stó:lō scholar who holds the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Arts at Queen’s University, located on Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe territory. His research focuses upon the sensory politics of Indigenous activism and the arts, and has included writing on Indigenous sound art, social arts practice, Indigenous languages in public space, and opera. His current research documents the history of contemporary Indigenous art in public spaces across North America. A second aspect of this project involves working with Indigenous artists and scholars to collaboratively to create new public works that acknowledge Indigenous histories of place, and materialize spatial sovereignty. His publications include the collection Arts of Engagement: Taking Aesthetic Action In and Beyond the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2016) and Opera Indigene (Ashgate Press, 2011).

Jonathan Dewar
Jonathan Dewar
Co-Investigator

Jonathan Dewar is the Senior Advisor to the Reconciliation Secretariat at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. From 2012 to 2016 he served as Director of the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and Special Advisor to the President at Algoma University, where he led research, education, and community service programming, including museum and gallery initiatives, and taught courses in Anishinaabe Studies, Law and Justice, and Fine Arts.

From 2007-2012 he served as Director of Research at the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and is a past director of the Métis Centre at the National Aboriginal Health Organization. Previously, Jonathan served as the founding executive director of the Iqaluit, Nunavut-based Qaggiq Theatre Company from its inception in 2002 to 2006. While in Nunavut, Jonathan also served in senior roles with the Office of the Languages Commissioner of Nunavut and the Intergovernmental Affairs and Inuit Relations unit of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Nunavut Region.

Jonathan is of mixed heritage, descended from Huron-Wendat, Scottish, and French Canadian grandparents with an academic background in Aboriginal arts and literatures and Indigenous studies. A former SSHRC doctoral fellow, Jonathan’s research explores the role of art and artist in truth, healing, and reconciliation. He recently completed a doctorate in Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. His dissertation is titled
"'Dance with us as you can...': Art, Artist, and Witness(ing) in Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Journey."

David Garneau
David Garneau
Co-Investigator

David Garneau (Métis) is Associate Professor of Visual Arts at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. His practice includes painting, performance art, video, curation, and critical writing. He is interested in issues of nature and culture, metaphysics and materialism, and in contemporary Indigenous identities and display. Garneau has recently given talks in Melbourne, Adelaide, New York, San Diego, Sacramento, Washington, Saskatoon, and keynote lectures in Sydney, Toronto, Edmonton, and Sault Ste Marie. He is currently working on curatorial and writing projects featuring contemporary Indigenous art and curatorial exchanges between Canada and Australia, and is part of a five-year, SSHRC funded curatorial research project, “Creative Conciliation.” With Michelle LaVallee, he curated Moving Forward, Never Forgetting, an exhibition about aggressive assimilation, for the Mackenzie Art Gallery in Regina (2015). He is also touring Dear John; Louis David Riel, a performance piece featuring a living Riel sculpture interacting with John A. Macdonald statues across Canada.

Here are some upcoming events/projects that David will be engaged with:

Keynote talk, “Indigenous Creative Sovereignty and the Decline of Second Nation States: Writers and Artists as Non-state Actors.” For the book launch of The Land We Are. Vancouver, Nov. 5, 2015.

“Return of the Native” workshop in Canberra, Australia (Dec. 2015) towards a book and conference on issues of the Indigenous in museums. David will be discussing the “Moving Forward, Never Forgetting” exhibition he curated with Michelle LaVallee (the exhibition and this travel are SSHRC funded).

Keynote talk in Canberra, Australia (Feb. 3. 2016) at the “Encounters: Revealing stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander objects from British Museum Collections” conference. This talk springs from ideas pursued during the Creative Conciliations project.

Keynote talk in Auckland, New Zealand (May 2016) at the Facing the Future conference, organized by Museums Australia and Museums New Zealand. This talk concerns conciliation in the museum.

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Ashok Mathur
Co-Investigator

Ashok Mathur’s cultural, critical, creative, and academic practice is wide ranging and investigates new models of artistic research and interdisciplinary collaboration, particularly those that pursue a social justice agenda. As a writer, cultural organizer, and interdisciplinary artist his work addresses the intersections of race, indigeneity, and creative and artistic research. His editorial work includes the anthology Cultivating Canada: reconciliation through the lens of cultural diversity (Aboriginal Healing Foundation, 2011), and numerous special volumes of arts and literary journals such as West Coast Line and Prairie Fire. He also edits CiCAC Press which publishes poetry, prose, and creative non-fiction using an alternative author-driven approach to support writers and readers. His novels include A Little Distillery in Nowgong (Arsenal Pulp Press, 2009) which also functioned as a collaborative art installation in Vancouver, Kamloops, and Ottawa; The Short Happy Life of Harry Kumar (Arsenal, 2001); and Once Upon an Elephant (Arsenal, 1998); in addition he has published a poetic novella, Loveruage (Wolsak and Wynn, 1993). As a Canada Research Chair in Cultural and Artistic Inquiry (awarded 2005 at Thompson Rivers University), he has organized and co-ordinated multiple arts-driven initiatives. Most recently he co-ordinated a month-°©‐long artist residency, Reconsidering Reconciliation, bringing twelve Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artists together at the Centre for innovation in Culture and the Arts in Canada (CiCAC). Previously, he has organized other residencies and colloquia in Banff, where he directed the international IntraNation residency in 2004, and Cyprus, where he co-convened the Performing Identity / Crossing Borders performance symposium. Prior to his CRC, Mathur was head of Critical and Cultural Studies at Emily Carr University. As an educator, Mathur works with critical race theory and radical/liberatory pedagogy to develop transformational and student-driven learning models.